More Than Enough

More Than EnoughPrayer. Participation. Provision.  Ministry requires all of these.  What if every missionary’s testimony was that they had too many people on their prayer team; that they had too many churches that were grooming people to join in the work full time on the mission field; that the money that they are receiving to do the work is coming in too fast?!  Lloyd and I were appointed with WorldVenture in 2002 – so I’ve only been a full time missionary for 15 years.  In all of that time I’ve never, ever heard even one of these phrases.

Here’s what I do know: the missionaries that I know are some of the most gifted, anointed, talented, innovative people that I have ever known.  They are creatively sharing the truth of the Gospel with a dying world and suffering much loss in the process, however, they count the loss as nothing to even mention.  They don’t go to the field because of some warm fuzzy feeling that overtakes them – they go because the call of God compels them to go!  They are not beggars who come to your church or small group because there is no where else to go — they are sent ones who come to your church or small group because they know that just as they have answered the call to go; the Body of Christ must answer the call to participate by praying, participating and giving provisions.

In Exodus – when the people realized that God had placed among them gifted artisans/skilled people to do the work; they willingly brought their gifts so that the work could be completed – so much so that Moses had to tell them to stop bringing gifts.  It would be a beautiful thing if this would happen in the Body of Christ today.  The work is not done!  Not for those who are sent out – and not for those responsible for sending them.

What would it take for the Body of Christ to support missions in this way?  

I don’t know.  But my prayer is that it will be so.  

The people are bringing much more than enough for the construction work which the Lord commanded us to perform.”  So Moses issued a command, and aproclamation was circulated throughout the camp, saying, “Let no man or woman any longer perform work for the contributions of the sanctuary.” Thus the people were restrained from bringing any more.  For the material they had was sufficient and more than enough for all the work, to perform it.  Exodus 36: 5 – 7

Interested in giving?  We have over 200 people serving in 12 countries across the continent of Africa.  Click on any of these country names to see how you might become a part of our More Than Enough!

WHERE WE ARE SERVING IN AFRICA

 

The Same … United … One Purpose

unity-in-ChristDivision in the world is front page news nowadays almost every day.  It is sad to see, but the news focuses on the world. not the Body of Christ, so it is not surprising.  The heartbreaking thing is to see the division within those who call themselves followers of Christ.  One of the things that gave me the most delight when we were living in Ghana was the privilege of bringing women together across denominations and people groups to be in fellowship; to study the Word of God; to practice the life of Christ; and to do ministry together.

Now that my role has been based in the USA – I’ve gotten approached by a couple of ladies who would like me to walk with them.  One asked me what joy I get from discipling someone.   I told her that one of my greatest joys is to see those who I walk with unified in love.

As I venture to disciple Christ followers it is my duty to see that the young ladies that I’m walking with know what it means to be unified and why.

  • First, I must teach that Christ has encouraged and admonished us to be one.
  • Second, they must know that my love for them is a gift from God – not anything earned by one of them more than another.  I love them all equally – showing no respect of persons.
  • Third, I must walk in the Spirit – exhibiting the fruit of the Spirit – modeling before them a life that displays an understanding of  God’s presence and a filling of the Holy Spirit.
  • Lastly, I must teach a message of grace, because that is what God’s affection towards us looks like.

As I do these things – I have seen time and time again that they are able to embrace their common purpose to glorify God and are better equipped to walk in UNITY.

My prayer is that the Father will show me how to walk according to His word ALWAYS! That my life will be an accurate model to those who are watching me; showing them the way to godly love compassion and unity.  That the world will see His grace through my life and unity through my own family.  May my life, my words, my actions lead others to become one in Him!

Therefore if there is any encouragement in Christ, if there is any consolation of love, if there is any fellowship of the Spirit, if any affection and compassion, make my joy complete by being of the same mind, maintaining the same love, united in spirit, intent on one purpose

Philippians 2:1-2

African American Missionaries MAKING History – Lloyd and Jan Chinn

IMG_0035Thank you for reading my blog during African American History Month as I highlighted some of my heroes. Tomorrow I will return to reflections from God’s Word. I hope that you have learned a lot and that the stories have been a blessing.

I know these people best – so I saved their story for the last day …

Lloyd and Jan Chinn are native to Texas. Lloyd from Edna, TX and Jan from Houston, TX. The Chinns met, married and their careers were rising when Lloyd sensed the Lord’s leading into ministry. Jan was working for Ernst & Young LLP in Private Client Services; Lloyd was working as a very successful political strategist in Houston, TX. In 1998, when Lloyd acknowledged his call to ministry the Lord spoke to the Chinn’s that May 15th would be Lloyd’s last day of secular work. The Chinn’s moved to Dallas that June where Lloyd attended Dallas Theological Seminary with a plan to return to their home church in Houston to engage in faith based community economic development. By now, Lloyd was in seminary full time and working for a local non-profit as an urban planner and Jan was working as Corporate Human Resources Manager for Rosewood Hotels and Resorts.

In 1999, Lloyd was invited to Ghana, West Africa on a short term mission. Lloyd and Jan had never even met a missionary and had no desire to enter into missionary service; they scarcely knew where Africa was – and had never heard of Ghana. Jan was resistant to Lloyd’s going; but God provided the funds for the journey and they took that as confirmation that Lloyd was to go. 5 days into Lloyd’s trip, he was asked to preach in the village of Pusupu – he had only preached twice before that and was nervous, but he preached from Ephesians 2 and about 10 people prayed to receive Christ! Lloyd was blown away. He returned to his room and while journaling about the day, God spoke to him clearly that Africa would be his context of ministry – it was May 15th – one year exactly from the day Lloyd left the secular work world. Lloyd returned to the USA and did not tell his wife about the call to Africa – but before the year’s end, Jan wanted to go and see Ghana. In 2000 they took all of their children and 22 other people to the same little town in Ghana – and on that trip, Jan’s experience opened her eyes to the need for discipleship in Ghana. Lloyd’s firm message to the African American church became: “Pray! Pay! or Pack!”

In 2002, Lloyd and Jan were appointed as long term missionaries with CBInternational (which is now WorldVenture) and were approved to open a new field of ministry in Ghana. Their mission agency was concerned that as African Americans, they wouldn’t be able to raise the financial support – but God had another plan! The Chinn’s had unprecedented support from the African American church in Texas. In 2004, the Chinns sold everything they owned and boarded a plane with their sons and one way tickets to Ghana, West Africa. It wasn’t easy – they did not have a team; they did not know the language or culture; they had to send their sons to boarding school in Senegal; they endured loneliness; the pain of being misunderstood; the hurt of being taken advantage of; a complete change of systems and culture and yet – they persevered. The Chinn’s call their ability to move to Ghana as a family and have effective ministry God’s anointing. They say He called them to it and He equipped them for it. Lloyd and Jan as well as their sons learned the Asante Twi language and developed friendships in both national and local government and across denominations in Ghana and learned to submit to the leaders in the church and in the community which gained them respect and love in the country. The Chinns served in Ghana for 10 years mainly in pastoral leadership development. The needs of the community in Nkwanta led them to also engage in orphan care, educational development and community economic development.

In 2013, they returned to the USA on a home assignment which was supposed to last 10 months. During their first few months in the US, the leadership of WorldVenture called and asked them to take on the role of International Ministries Director for Africa. In March 2014, they stepped in to this new role where they are now missionaries to the missionary; providing pastoral care, leadership development and strategic planning assistance for 108 missionary units (some families; some singles) in 12 countries across Africa. They are the first African Americans to serve in this capacity with their mission.

African American Missionary History – Amanda Berry Smith

smith_amanda_berryEvangelist and missionary Amanda Berry Smith (1837-1915) became well known for her beautiful voice and inspired teaching and hence, opportunities to evangelize in the South and West opened up for her.

In 1876, she was invited to speak and sing in England travelling on a first class cabin provided by her friends. The captain invited her to conduct a religious service on board and she was so modest that the other passengers spread word of her and resulted in her staying in England and Scotland for a year and a half.

She next traveled to and ministered in India, then spent eight years in Africa (Egypt, Sierra Leone, Liberia) working with churches and evangelizing. While in Africa she suffered from repeated attacks of “African Fever” but persisted in her work. In her journal entry for February 5, 1884 she writes:

“Second Gospel Temperance meeting. Surely the Spirit of the Lord is with us, and He is blessing us greatly. Not so much liberty in speaking, but God is with us, and we are expecting great things. Oh, Lord, for Jesus’ sake, answer prayer, and send us the Holy Ghost to quicken and revive us.”

She founded the Amanda Smith Orphans’ Home for African-American children in a suburb of Chicago. She was called “God’s image carved in ebony.” Amanda Smith retired to Sebring, Florida in 1912 due to failing health. She died in 1915 at the age of 78.

Amanda has one of very few written autobiographies by black americans of that time period.  You can read her an electronic copy of her autobiography “An Autobiography. The Story of the Lord’s Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith the Colored Evangelist; Containing an Account of Her Life Work of Faith, and Her Travels in America, England, Ireland, Scotland, India, and Africa, as an Independent Missionary”at this link –  Autobiography of Amanda Smith

African American Missionary History – John Day

Judge John DayJohn Day was the first African American appointed by the Southern Baptist Conventions Foreign Missions Board (SBC). Day was born in Virginia in 1797.

He was ordained a Baptist minister in 1821 and had hopes of ministering in Haiti but could not garner enough support among Virginia Baptist . In 1830, he migrated to Liberia to minister and shortly thereafter was appointed by the Triennial Convention’s Baptist Board of Foreign Missions. In 1844, he resigned from the Triennial Convention post and was appointed by the SBC and given the lead of their ministry in Liberia. Day was a missionary to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Central Africa and is known as a founding father of Liberia because he signed its Declaration of Independence and also became the Republic’s chief justice.

Within one year of his family’s arrival in Liberia, his wife and all of his 5 children died. John Day spent 13 years in Africa and is estimated to have preached to more than 10,000 people during his ministry. In 1856 he founded Day’s Hope, a high school and seminary intended to train African boys as missionaries to their own people. John Day died on February 15, 1859 and on his deathbed, when asked how he was feeling, said these words –

“If I speak with regard to the union subsisting between me and Christ, I am well.”