African American MISSIONARY History – Eliza Davis George

Eliza GeorgeEliza Davis George was born in 1879.  In December 1913 she left Texas for New York; and on December 12, 1913, she sailed from New York to Liberiaas a National Baptist missionary.

Eliza and another missionary opened a school for children in the interior of Liberia, where there were few missionaries or churches. They called the school Bible Industrial Academy, and their aim was to teach children to read the Bible and show them helpful life skills. Within the first two years they had fifty children attending the academy and saw more than 1,000 people accept the Lord in the nearby villages.

Eliza served as an evangelist, teacher, and church planter throughout Sinoe County, Liberia. Wherever she established ministries, she trained Liberian young people and sent them as missionaries to take the Word of God to their own people and to provide education for their children.

Five years after arriving in Liberia, Eliza’s mission board disbanded. Lacking financial support, she was approached by a British missionary doctor who urged her to marry him so that she would be able to remain in Africa. After much prayer, she concluded that God was permitting her to marry, and in 1919, Eliza became the wife of Dr. Charles George. Together they adopted three children: Maude, Cecelia, and Cerella.

Even when married, Eliza continued to live meagerly, trusting in the Lord’s provision and going to extraordinary lengths to secure support for the ministry Jesus had called her to. Her prayer life reflected her dependence on God:

“O heavenly Father, thou hast taught us to pray for our daily bread. Lord, thou dost know that I do not have one penny to buy food and pay the workers here at the mission. Father, send us something to meet our needs as thou hast promised. Help me to keep trusting Thee so that the children will know Thou art caring for them.”

In 1939, her husband passed away – yet she continued in the work for 33 more years.  By the 1960s The Eliza Davis George Baptist Association had twenty-seven churches in Liberia.

Eliza returned to the USA in 1972 at the age of 93 due to fragile health.  She passed away in Tyler, TX in March 1980.

Home Assignment Versus Furlough

This entry is intended to educate all of my loved ones about what our time in the USA will look like.  We are on Home Assignment – we are not on furlough.  A furlough is like a leave of absence and is usually granted to service personnel (i.e. Army, Navy, etc.); to prisoners; or are given as a type of temporary lay off from a job.

We are not on vacation or leave – and we have not been laid off as missionaries.  So – we are NOT on furlough.

We are on Home Assignment.  A home assignment is a normal part of our regular missionary service. The word assignment should give you a clue that we are in the USA on task. Home assignment is a time when we will:

  • Connect with supporting churches and individuals for accountability
  • Connect with prayer partners
  • Connect with potential donors to build up our support base
  • Hold fundraisers to raise capital funds for our large projects
  • Pursue development opportunities in our ministry and personally
  • Recruit workers for Ghana and for WorldVenture at large
  • Taking time for rest and restoration in order that we will be ready to return at the end of our time
  • Be involved in the local church where we will be based. (Dallas, TX)

One of the things that we will do most is TRAVEL!!  We will be based in Dallas, TX – but will be traveling as necessary to provide ministry updates to supporters and for any other special project that our church connections team deems appropriate.

A personal family task is helping Jeremy to transition back to the US as a college student AND to get some uninterrupted family time – which is nearly impossible when we are on the field.

This is our 2nd home assignment and we are looking forward to the journey and looking forward to watching God help us to achieve each of these goals so that we can return to the field in May 2014 in full physical, spiritual and financial health.

Complain and Compare? — or Rejoice in the Lord?

It breaks my heart as a missionary when I hear ministers of the gospel – whether pastors or missionaries or worship leaders or etc. etc. etc. – complain about the hardships that come with their ministries.  It breaks my heart because whatever God has called us to – He ALWAYS is faithful to give us the grace to endure – so rather than complain, we should rejoice that He sees in us something that makes us worthy of His calling.  We should remember that He instructed us to count it all joy – because it is temporary.  I am a woman who hates dirt, bugs, and disorder – and God sent me to a place with all of the above and I am grateful and satisfied in His place for me.  I am satisfied because I feel the Lord’s pleasure over my life and ministry.  I have no cause at all to complain.

It breaks my heart when I hear ministers of the gospel compare their work to another’s – whether they feel like their work is more or less important. Rather than comparing – we should be celebrating the victories that our co-laborers experience, and mourning with them over any defeats. When I hear from my friends in Rwanda who are training pastors; or Mozambique who are discipling leaders and providing protein with a egg farm; or in Tanzania who are building schools in villages where there are no schools; or in Senegal who train pastors and help children of the Talibe; or Cote D’Ivoire who provide medical care and Bible translation – I say Hallelujah our team of workers for the Kingdom is doing what He has called us to do.   And more than that I pray for them and when  I have resources available I support their work financially.

I guess it all boils down to where we find our contentment.  Mine is found in Him – and in Him alone!  So I choose to rejoice in my trials and rejoice in the victories of other minister’s of the gospel as well. After all — isn’t it all about Him???

Do all things without grumbling and complaining – Philippians 2:14

If anyone thinks he is something when he is nothing, he deceives himself. But each one must examine his own work, and then he will have reason for boasting in regard to himself alone, and not in regard to another. Galatians 6:3,4