Trust God to Meet Every Need

Expect Nothing Appreciate Everything

When Lloyd and I were first starting out in ministry, I used to tell the wives that I didn’t trust my husband, but in God. This sentence worried some people since they didn’t comprehend what I meant. I don’t mean to imply that I expect my spouse to behave badly; rather, I recognize that my husband will never be able to meet every demand in my life since he, like me, is made of flesh. Hubby will, without a doubt, fail me in some way, and I will, without a doubt, fail him in some way! Just cannot meet EVERY need in my life.

Please keep in mind that I am married to possibly the best man on the face of the planet! He is kind to me; he is loving to me; he is patient with me; he tenderly cares for me; he is careful to protect me; he is a good friend to me; he is my very best friend; he makes me laugh; he rejoices in my joys; he feels my sorrows, and though I truly believe Lloyd is the perfect guy for me — he, my LSC, is certainly Is Not Perfect!

When we embarked on this journey as husband and wife, we made intentional decisions to return the marriage to God. We understood early in our marriage that it was best to have no expectations from one another and to rely solely on God in all circumstances. This approach, I believe, has given us both a great deal of pleasure in the ways we bless each other. That may not be clear, so allow me to explain. — In general, Lloyd and I have duties in our marriage: Lloyd takes care of the car, I make sure there is nutritious food in the house, Lloyd will be the provider, I will be the counselor, and so on. While Lloyd and I were both aware of these expectations, none of us held the other to them. We never assumed that the other would be ideal for any given role. He committed to love me as Christ loves the church, and I committed to respect and build Him up as the head of my family; and we agreed that the rest would be taken care of by Our Father’s lead and His guidance. What has happened in these 28 years and 6 months is that when I cook for Lloyd, he is truly grateful because he knows I could choose not to. I am sincerely grateful when Lloyd has the car serviced and fills it with gas because I know he could chose not to. Now, neither of us has ever chosen not to serve the other, but because our trust is in God, not in each other, each act of love is a true blessing that is warmly accepted and graciously offered!

Because it worked in our marriage, we applied it to our relationship with God in all things. Rather than expecting Him to meet our expectations, we just rely on Him to do what He does as God and Father. Instead of living with a sense of entitlement to His benefits, we choose to walk with a sense of humility before Him, setting our petitions before Him and leaving them there. We transitioned from saying “”Good job, God!” to “Wow! Thank you, Father, for your generous care for us!”

Many Christians have reduced God to the role of “Genie.” We declare, “God is a Healer,” as if our words demand that He heal, rather than saying, “God is a Healer,” and putting that ailment at His feet, expecting only that His will be done, and bracing ourselves to be startled by the extravagant nature of His tremendous love. We do the same with each of God’s attributes, such as Provider, Peace Giver, Keeper, and so on. What if we made the decision to expect that we can rely on Him and determine that no matter what happens, we will respond with heartfelt gratitude? He has informed us that we will face trials and should rejoice in them; how can we do so truly if we are continually expecting Him to fix them to our liking rather than expecting Him to work them out for our good and His glory?! I’m not suggesting it’ll be easy, but I believe He’ll give us the strength we need to respond correctly. He is the King! He is right! His ways are all good and holy! Will you not put your trust in Him today? Expect nothing; only rely on God!

The Wilderness …

The wilderness of this world. Have you ever thought about that? The wilderness of this world. In old English, the word (wildēornes) means land inhabited only by wild animals. Have you ever thought about that?

I could see the world right now while I was thinking about that term. Wild animals are fully self-sufficient. They find a home in a location that fits their needs. They live in an environment that provides them with the food and space that their species needs. They disguise themselves to blend in with any area they find themselves in, allowing them to avoid predators and stay healthy during harsh weather. Animals who only consume plants are eaten by meat-eating animals. They all go to rivers and ponds to get the water they need to survive. Habitat degradation, climate change, illegal trafficking, pollution, climate change, and other factors are putting them all at risk. Have you given it any thought?

For the time being, we depend on people to survive. Farmers, water treatment facilities, physicians, nurses, grocery stores, building crews, general contractors, security firms, air conditioning and heating companies, airlines, lodging facilities, hotels, entertainment industries, power companies, and so much more are all essential for our survival. This can be considered self-sufficient in the sense that people depend on one another. We settle in places that fulfill our needs for culture, low taxes, proximity to work, comfort, and proximity to family and friends, among other things. We make adjustments to fit in at work, in the church group where we serve, among new friends, and to interact with our neighbors, among other things. We do this to hide from people who might see something we have and go for it, as well as people who might notice that we have nothing. We all see others who think like us as members of our people group, and others as members of another. Many who believe in Christ divide themselves from one another due to differing behavioral values. We don’t allow our faith in Christ to remind us that He died for all and that those who believe in Him are members of His Body. Some of us would not go across the line to join the rest. Some of us tend to associate with other Christians of various kinds. For the sake of the Gospel, some of us communicate with everyone. Some of us would rather be with our own race or ethnicity. Some of us are just interested in our own political party. Some of us would rather be with people our own age. Humans just want to make sure that the teaching of God’s Word is strong around us, but even that divides us because each people group believes that they are right. It’s the middle of nowhere. Have you given it any thought?

Difficulties come in the wilderness. And we’re in it. All of us lean into what we think is right, what we think is needed and we cast others to the side. We judge, with hate, those who do not walk down the same political path and we seek to destroy them. We have no care in our hearts for those who don’t look like us …. red and yellow; black and white … many of us see no need for us to be together. We condemn those who have differing behavioral beliefs within the Body of Christ …. women wear dresses, men rule, what the filling of the Holy Spirit looks like, ordination of women, liturgies only, sacraments observed … and SO much more. The bottom line is this … Our Dependence is Upon The God of ALL the Earth!!

All that we need comes from Him. He created every single one of us. He loves every single one of us. He sent His son, Jesus, to die for every single one of us. In the distress we are brining to on another for the sake of our own glory, the only way that we will see His hand at work is if we truly understand that as believers in Christ, we are one Body! We are not all hands. We are not all legs. We are not all eyes. We are not all feet. We are not all arms. We are a complete BODY!

Let’s do better y’all! I want to see His glory, not yours? I want to see His hand at work, not yours. I want to see His kindness, more than our kindness. I want to see His hand in bringing all things He has called His children to do to victory. Let His work be seen among us, not our own. Let Him rebuild us. Let His face shine upon us – so that our peace will be real. Let’s allow His grace to come in to us. We don’t deserve His help, but He grants it to us when we are doing all for the sake of His glory. All that we are and all that we do has to be for His glory and not for our own. Only then will we see His favor in our lives.

WILDERNESS. Just as he delivered the Jews, He will deliver us if only we can stop trying to meet our needs but, rather, seek to glorify Him.

Praying that our ways and our hearts will change so that the favor of Our Lord can rest upon us. Praying that He will replace all of our current bad days with good days. Praying that we will know how to let Him rule over us and bless us; and that we will cease trying to rule over one another and fill our minds with the lie that we are the ones that bring blessing to one another. He is wonderful!! He is awesome!! He is all powerful!! He is ALWAYS right! Praying that the Body of Christ will yield to all that we need from Him and that we will all be praying every single day that He would hide us behind His cross and fill us afresh with His Holy Spirit!

Eliza Davis George. Liberia. 1913 – 1917

Eliza Davis George served in Liberia, 1913 to 1972.

Eliza Davis George was born in 1879.  In December 1913 she left Texas for New York; and on December 12, 1913, she sailed from New York to Liberia as a National Baptist missionary.

Eliza and another missionary opened a school for children in the interior of Liberia, where there were few missionaries or churches. They called the school Bible Industrial Academy, and their aim was to teach children to read the Bible and show them helpful life skills. Within the first two years they had fifty children attending the academy and saw more than 1,000 people accept the Lord in the nearby villages.

Eliza served as an evangelist, teacher, and church planter throughout Sinoe County, Liberia. Wherever she established ministries, she trained Liberian young people and sent them as missionaries to take the Word of God to their own people and to provide education for their children.

Five years after arriving in Liberia, Eliza’s mission board disbanded. Lacking financial support, she was approached by a British missionary doctor who urged her to marry him so that she would be able to remain in Africa. After much prayer, she concluded that God was permitting her to marry, and in 1919, Eliza became the wife of Dr. Charles George. Together they adopted three children: Maude, Cecelia, and Cerella.

Even when married, Eliza continued to live meagerly, trusting in the Lord’s provision and going to extraordinary lengths to secure support for the ministry Jesus had called her to. Her prayer life reflected her dependence on God:

“O heavenly Father, thou hast taught us to pray for our daily bread. Lord, thou dost know that I do not have one penny to buy food and pay the workers here at the mission. Father, send us something to meet our needs as thou hast promised. Help me to keep trusting Thee so that the children will know Thou art caring for them.”

In 1939, her husband passed away – yet she continued in the work for 33 more years.  By the 1960s The Eliza Davis George Baptist Association had twenty-seven churches in Liberia.

Eliza returned to the USA in 1972 at the age of 93 due to fragile health.  She passed away in Tyler, TX in March 1980.

Louise (“Lulu”) Cecilia Fleming.Congo. Served from 1887 – 1899

Lulu was born 1862 as a slave in Florida. In 1887 she became a missionary teacher in Congo. The students were being introduced to Jesus because of Lulu’s ministry to them. The school had 49 students and many of them came to Christ through Lulu’s ministry to them.

This seems a poor report…and perhaps many may think the work almost discouraging, but to us whom God has given the privilege to labor here it is very encouraging. [It] fills us with unspeakable joy.

Lulu combined her teaching with weekend evangelistic work in the towns and within a year she had learned Kikongo and no longer required a translator. When Lulu saw that women needed to be reached, she began making home visits while urging the mission society (American Baptist Foreign Mission Society of the West) to send more women.

In 1891 Lulu return to the USA as a student at the Women’s Medical College in Philadelphia, Lulu returned to the Congo in 1895 as a medical missionary.

Known now as Dr. Fleming, she was stationed at Irebu, further up the Congo River where she needed to learn a different language. The power of Dr. Fleming’s ministry came from her identification with those among whom she served. The Baptist Missionary Magazine described her as “particularly successful in winning the hearts of the Congo people, putting herself in close touch and sympathy with them.” She passed away in 1899 from complications from African sleeping sickness.

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Carrie Elizabeth Merriweather; Sierra Leone – served 1913 – 1931

Carrie Elizabeth Merriweather was born July 28, 1881, in Carthage, Indiana. When she was 17 years old she moved to Ohio and attended a Bible School. Merriweather enrolled at Nyack College & Seminary (The Missionary Training Institute) in 1910.

Carrie answered her call to missions upon completion of NYACK and began her ministry in Sierra Leone in 1913 with the C & MA mission organization. She was the first female African-American missionary to be sent by the the C&MA. Around 1918 Carrie fell ill and had to leave Sierra Leone.

Though she left Africa, her passion was to open her home to people as much as possible to encourage them to follow the Lord despite their fear if they were being called to work in Africa.

Carrie passed away March 20, 1931.

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