Eliza Davis George. Liberia. 1913 – 1917

Eliza Davis George served in Liberia, 1913 to 1972.

Eliza Davis George was born in 1879.  In December 1913 she left Texas for New York; and on December 12, 1913, she sailed from New York to Liberia as a National Baptist missionary.

Eliza and another missionary opened a school for children in the interior of Liberia, where there were few missionaries or churches. They called the school Bible Industrial Academy, and their aim was to teach children to read the Bible and show them helpful life skills. Within the first two years they had fifty children attending the academy and saw more than 1,000 people accept the Lord in the nearby villages.

Eliza served as an evangelist, teacher, and church planter throughout Sinoe County, Liberia. Wherever she established ministries, she trained Liberian young people and sent them as missionaries to take the Word of God to their own people and to provide education for their children.

Five years after arriving in Liberia, Eliza’s mission board disbanded. Lacking financial support, she was approached by a British missionary doctor who urged her to marry him so that she would be able to remain in Africa. After much prayer, she concluded that God was permitting her to marry, and in 1919, Eliza became the wife of Dr. Charles George. Together they adopted three children: Maude, Cecelia, and Cerella.

Even when married, Eliza continued to live meagerly, trusting in the Lord’s provision and going to extraordinary lengths to secure support for the ministry Jesus had called her to. Her prayer life reflected her dependence on God:

“O heavenly Father, thou hast taught us to pray for our daily bread. Lord, thou dost know that I do not have one penny to buy food and pay the workers here at the mission. Father, send us something to meet our needs as thou hast promised. Help me to keep trusting Thee so that the children will know Thou art caring for them.”

In 1939, her husband passed away – yet she continued in the work for 33 more years.  By the 1960s The Eliza Davis George Baptist Association had twenty-seven churches in Liberia.

Eliza returned to the USA in 1972 at the age of 93 due to fragile health.  She passed away in Tyler, TX in March 1980.

Evans and Jeanette Walton. Ghana. Began Serving 2016

Evans is from northern. Ghana. His mother converted from Islam when he was young, and led him to Christ. As a young teenager he was active in the Elim Christian Center in Accra Ghana. After graduating from Ghana Christian University in 2009, he entered into an internship with WorldVenture Ghana, which led him to a ministry life focused on reaching the lost.  

Jeanette is from North Carolina. Jeanette had a passion for foreign missions. In 2013, she heard an invitation to serve in Ghana and she answered it; serving as an English teacher.  

Evans and Jeanette met in 2013. Evans was in Ghana on a break from his Seminary studies while Jeanette was serving there in an internship with WorldVenture Ghana. They married in 2016 and are now serving as missionaries in Navrongo – Upper East Region of Ghana.

Their Mission Statement: To glorify God by loving Christ, worshiping Him and seeing His kingdom come in Navrongo, Ghana through engaging the community by way of the local church, evangelizing, and holistically raising fruit bearing disciples who will do likewise and reach the unreached.

Jeanette is working at increasing educational access for children in northern Ghana so that more families can read and study the Word of God for themselves. She is drawing lost souls to the gospel through education and performance.

Evans says that, “the realization of God’s grace in my life, from being raised by a widowed single mother in a small village, to attending institutions of higher learning to teach others about the saving grace of Christ, has pushed me to give my all to Him; we are blessed, to be a blessing.” In August of 2015, Evans completed a Bachelor’s degree in theology from International Leadership University (ILU) in Nairobi,Kenya. 

They serve at the Navrongo Community Nursing College and the University of Development Studies- Navrongo – praying for and welcoming new students. They have planted a church, Hope Community Church, and started a special needs Christian school, Jeanette Okunyade Special Children School (named after the late Dr. Jeanette Okunyade).

Their ultimate desire is to see lives transformed by Christ in Ghana, and within the continent of Africa. They are involved in evangelism on the University of Development Studies campus, discipleship, Christian Leadership Development and Community Development. 

Join their team – in prayer, in financial support, or to serve with them: https://worldventure.com/pmissionary/4000-329-walton-evans-and-jeanette/

Louise (“Lulu”) Cecilia Fleming.Congo. Served from 1887 – 1899

Lulu was born 1862 as a slave in Florida. In 1887 she became a missionary teacher in Congo. The students were being introduced to Jesus because of Lulu’s ministry to them. The school had 49 students and many of them came to Christ through Lulu’s ministry to them.

This seems a poor report…and perhaps many may think the work almost discouraging, but to us whom God has given the privilege to labor here it is very encouraging. [It] fills us with unspeakable joy.

Lulu combined her teaching with weekend evangelistic work in the towns and within a year she had learned Kikongo and no longer required a translator. When Lulu saw that women needed to be reached, she began making home visits while urging the mission society (American Baptist Foreign Mission Society of the West) to send more women.

In 1891 Lulu return to the USA as a student at the Women’s Medical College in Philadelphia, Lulu returned to the Congo in 1895 as a medical missionary.

Known now as Dr. Fleming, she was stationed at Irebu, further up the Congo River where she needed to learn a different language. The power of Dr. Fleming’s ministry came from her identification with those among whom she served. The Baptist Missionary Magazine described her as “particularly successful in winning the hearts of the Congo people, putting herself in close touch and sympathy with them.” She passed away in 1899 from complications from African sleeping sickness.

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Althea Brown Edmiston. Congo. Served 1902 – 1937

Althea was born in 1874 in Alabama. Her parents were emancipated from slavery, and she was raised on her father’s farm in Mississippi.

She attended Fisk University, graduated in 1901. Althea was commissioned as a missionary in 1901 by the Southern Presbyterian Church. She sailed for the Congo in 1902 and worked at a mission station run by William Henry Sheppard – another Black American Missionary.

In 1905 she married Alonzo Edmiston and they had two sons, both born in the Congo Region. Her husband was also a Black Missionary.

Altheas’s work was as a nurse and also in the area of linguistics. Her work was amazing because she did the linguistics work without any prior training. In the local Bushong language, she ensured that a a grammar and dictionary resource was published. Liturgical and educational materials were translated by Althea so that there was a small library printed for her students to read in their own language.

She passed away in 1937.

Two books that tell the story:

A Life for the Congo: The Story of Althea Brown Edmiston
A Higher Mission: The Careers of Alonzo and Althea Brown Edmiston in Central Africa

Prince Williams. Bahamas Islands. Served 50 years

Rev. Prince Williams was an escaped slave from South Carolina – he fled to St. Augustine Florida.  He was the first African-American Baptist missionary to the Bahama Islands. He left Saint Augustine, FL, around 1790 headed for Nassau.  On August 1, 1790, he obtained land and ground breaking ceremonies for Bethel’s Meeting House commenced on Monday, August 1st, 1790.

Williams was not satisfied with the thatch roofed structure – but it was the style of building that anabaptists were relegated to at the time.  In 1801 he built a ‘proper’ wooden house of worship, and changed the name to Bethel Baptist Chapel.  Bethel was not only the first church in the vicinity but it was also the first wooden building ever erected in an undeveloped area. Williams served as the Pastor of Bethel Baptist Church for 44 years.  The Foreign Missionary Baptist Society then assigned a new pastor to the church.

Pastor Williams continued to lead people to Christ and at age 70 Williams erected St. John’s Baptist Church and ministered there until his death in 1840 at age 104.

164 churches were birthed from his ministry in the Bahamas!  Amazingly he could read but could not write.

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