Big Kingdom Living

Live Big

Jesus is, presently, seated at the right hand of the Father. He reigns today. The regime of our King is a present, proceeding, advancing reality. Because this is true – it means that as children of The Most High God we can rejoice in this truth that His vision and plan for us is in the works now and includes every aspect of our lives — EVERY aspect.

So … now take that truth and apply it to your today. If He lives within you and if the Kingdom of God is today — then you have a choice to make; allow the presence and power of His kingdom to permeate your life. Allow His presence and power to invade your hopes for the future. Allow His presence and power to shape your view of yourself. Allow His presence and power to inform your understanding of who He is.

Your faith, properly placed in Him, is strong enough to support the dreams that you feel are impossible! Your faith, properly placed in Him, will allow you to experience the truth that He can do more than you can ask, think or imagine.

Picture this — your faith, as you nurture it, will grow and become stronger — strong enough for your life’s goals to be lifted up as offerings to the Most High! Strong enough to sustain your hopes and rebuke your doubts. Your faith, when nurtured and when placed in Him, will allow you to rejoice in the fact that He is your Benevolent Sovereign who finds great pleasure in showering you with his agape love and who assures that as you submit to His kingdom you will enjoy his good will in your present reality.

Paul David Tripp calls it Big Kingdom Living — living like Christ is the basis of all that you speak, execute, and envision.  Living your life such that “God’s purposes become your functional life goal.” Being all that He has created you to be — doing all that He has created you to do. Awesome!

Henry Highland Garnet served in Jamaica, Liberia, New York & Pittsburgh; 1842 – 1882

Henry Highland Garnet. Born into slavery in Maryland in 1815, Garnet and his family escaped to New York City when he was nine years old. In New York City, Garnet attended the African Free School. In the 1830s, Garnet continued his education at several institutions. He eventually ended up at the Oneida Institute in Whitesboro, New York, finishing his studies in 1840. He became a Presbyterian minister and served as the first pastor of the Liberty Street Negro Presbyterian Church in Troy, New York, beginning in 1842.

His “Call to Rebellion” speech in 1843 encouraged slaves to rebel against their owners. In 1850, Garnet traveled to England and Scotland, where he spoke widely against the practice of slavery. He also supported allowing blacks to emigrate to other lands, such as Liberia in Africa, a country made up mostly of freed slaves. In 1852, Garnet traveled to Jamaica to serve as a missionary. Ill health forced his return to the U.S. in 1855, where he continued his work in the abolitionist movement. In 1856, he served as pastor of the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church in Washington, DC.

On February 12, 1865, while in Washington, Garnet made history when he was chosen by President Abraham Lincoln to speak to the House of Representatives—making him the first African American to preach a sermon in the U.S. House of Representatives.

In 1868, Garnet was appointed president of Avery College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Later he returned to New York City as a pastor at the Shiloh Presbyterian Church (formerly the First Colored Presbyterian Church, and now St. James Presbyterian Church in Harlem).  

Fulfilling a longtime dream, Garnet traveled to Africa in 1881, appointed as the U.S. Minister to Liberia. He died in 1882, a few months after his arrival. Garnet was given a state funeral by the Liberian government and was buried at Palm Grove Cemetery in Monrovia.

The humblest peasant is as free in the sight of God as the proudest monarch that ever swayed a sceptre. Liberty is a spirit sent from God and like its great Author is no respecter of persons.” 

Henry Highland Garnet

Rev. Prince Williams served Bahamas Islands. Served 50 years

Rev. Prince Williams was an escaped slave from South Carolina – he fled to St. Augustine Florida.  He was the first African-American Baptist missionary to the Bahama Islands. He left Saint Augustine, FL, around 1790 headed for Nassau.  On August 1, 1790, he obtained land and ground breaking ceremonies for Bethel’s Meeting House commenced on Monday, August 1st, 1790.

Williams was not satisfied with the thatch roofed structure – but it was the style of building that anabaptists were relegated to at the time.  In 1801 he built a ‘proper’ wooden house of worship, and changed the name to Bethel Baptist Chapel.  Bethel was not only the first church in the vicinity but it was also the first wooden building ever erected in an undeveloped area. Williams served as the Pastor of Bethel Baptist Church for 44 years.  The Foreign Missionary Baptist Society then assigned a new pastor to the church.

Pastor Williams continued to lead people to Christ and at age 70 Williams erected St. John’s Baptist Church and ministered there until his death in 1840 at age 104.

164 churches were birthed from his ministry in the Bahamas!  Amazingly he could read but could not write.

Click Here to Find Out how to Serve for a Lifetime!

Evans and Jeanette Walton. Ghana. Began Serving 2016

Evans is from northern. Ghana. His mother converted from Islam when he was young, and led him to Christ. As a young teenager he was active in the Elim Christian Center in Accra Ghana. After graduating from Ghana Christian University in 2009, he entered into an internship with WorldVenture Ghana, which led him to a ministry life focused on reaching the lost.  

Jeanette is from North Carolina. Jeanette had a passion for foreign missions. In 2013, she heard an invitation to serve in Ghana and she answered it; serving as an English teacher.  

Evans and Jeanette met in 2013. Evans was in Ghana on a break from his Seminary studies while Jeanette was serving there in an internship with WorldVenture Ghana. They married in 2016 and are now serving as missionaries in Navrongo – Upper East Region of Ghana.

Their Mission Statement: To glorify God by loving Christ, worshiping Him and seeing His kingdom come in Navrongo, Ghana through engaging the community by way of the local church, evangelizing, and holistically raising fruit bearing disciples who will do likewise and reach the unreached.

Jeanette is working at increasing educational access for children in northern Ghana so that more families can read and study the Word of God for themselves. She is drawing lost souls to the gospel through education and performance.

Evans says that, “the realization of God’s grace in my life, from being raised by a widowed single mother in a small village, to attending institutions of higher learning to teach others about the saving grace of Christ, has pushed me to give my all to Him; we are blessed, to be a blessing.” In August of 2015, Evans completed a Bachelor’s degree in theology from International Leadership University (ILU) in Nairobi,Kenya. 

They serve at the Navrongo Community Nursing College and the University of Development Studies- Navrongo – praying for and welcoming new students. They have planted a church, Hope Community Church, and started a special needs Christian school, Jeanette Okunyade Special Children School (named after the late Dr. Jeanette Okunyade).

Their ultimate desire is to see lives transformed by Christ in Ghana, and within the continent of Africa. They are involved in evangelism on the University of Development Studies campus, discipleship, Christian Leadership Development and Community Development. 

Join their team – in prayer, in financial support, or to serve with them: https://worldventure.com/pmissionary/4000-329-walton-evans-and-jeanette/

Louise (“Lulu”) Cecilia Fleming served in Congo; 1887 – 1899.

Lulu was born in 1862 as a slave in Florida. In 1887 she became a missionary teacher in Congo. The school had 49 students, and many of them came to Christ through Lulu’s ministry to them. The students were introduced to Jesus because of Lulu’s ministry to them.

This seems a poor report…and perhaps many may think the work almost discouraging, but to us whom God has given the privilege to labor here it is very encouraging. [It] fills us with unspeakable joy. “

Lulu combined her teaching with weekend evangelistic work in the towns, and within a year, she had learned Kikongo and no longer required a translator. When Lulu saw that women needed to be reached, she began making home visits while urging the mission society (American Baptist Foreign Mission Society of the West) to send more women.

In 1891 Lulu returned to the USA as a student at the Women’s Medical College in Philadelphia; Lulu returned to the Congo in 1895 as a medical missionary.

Known as Dr. Fleming, she was stationed at Irebu, further up the Congo River, where she needed to learn a different language. The power of Dr. Fleming’s ministry came from her identification with those among whom she served. The Baptist Missionary Magazine described her as “particularly successful in winning the hearts of the Congo people, putting herself in close touch and sympathy with them.” 

She passed away in 1899 from complications from African sleeping sickness.