Honor The Son to Honor The Father

The telling thing about pseudo-Christian religions is their view of Jesus. The acceptance of and belief in God is easy for people. Almost every person is comfortable with thoughts about and conversations about God. But when Jesus is mentioned, you will know true believers because we have no doubt that he is the Son of God! 

Acknowledging His divinity and His oneness with the Father is at the core of real Christianity. A Christ follower will always give honor to the Father and the Son. Those who deny the deity of the Son are withholding from Him His due honor-and thus are withholding from the Father his due honor. Woe to them! 

As ministers of the gospel, we must be careful not to become satisfied when someone says they believe in, or trust in, God. We have to want to ensure that this is true. I’m not talking about pushing and challenging folks, but I’m talking about having a heart that is willing to disciple and teach them toward the truth and thus toward salvation, which is true reconciliation with the Father. 

Jesus will receive equal honor, glory and praise! This is the decision that The Father made!

I am praying that the Father will give us the boldness to speak out for Christ at all times. Teach us gentleness when we recognize a person’s unbelief in order that we may guide people to the truth. May we always proclaim the Savior and give honor to Him, thereby giving glory to the Father. Forgive us, Lord, for neglecting to take opportunities to lead people to the truth!

Henry Highland Garnet served in Jamaica, Liberia, New York & Pittsburgh; 1842 – 1882

Henry Highland Garnet. Born into slavery in Maryland in 1815, Garnet and his family escaped to New York City when he was nine years old. In New York City, Garnet attended the African Free School. In the 1830s, Garnet continued his education at several institutions. He eventually ended up at the Oneida Institute in Whitesboro, New York, finishing his studies in 1840. He became a Presbyterian minister and served as the first pastor of the Liberty Street Negro Presbyterian Church in Troy, New York, beginning in 1842.

His “Call to Rebellion” speech in 1843 encouraged slaves to rebel against their owners. In 1850, Garnet traveled to England and Scotland, where he spoke widely against the practice of slavery. He also supported allowing blacks to emigrate to other lands, such as Liberia in Africa, a country made up mostly of freed slaves. In 1852, Garnet traveled to Jamaica to serve as a missionary. Ill health forced his return to the U.S. in 1855, where he continued his work in the abolitionist movement. In 1856, he served as pastor of the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church in Washington, DC.

On February 12, 1865, while in Washington, Garnet made history when he was chosen by President Abraham Lincoln to speak to the House of Representatives—making him the first African American to preach a sermon in the U.S. House of Representatives.

In 1868, Garnet was appointed president of Avery College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Later he returned to New York City as a pastor at the Shiloh Presbyterian Church (formerly the First Colored Presbyterian Church, and now St. James Presbyterian Church in Harlem).  

Fulfilling a longtime dream, Garnet traveled to Africa in 1881, appointed as the U.S. Minister to Liberia. He died in 1882, a few months after his arrival. Garnet was given a state funeral by the Liberian government and was buried at Palm Grove Cemetery in Monrovia.

The humblest peasant is as free in the sight of God as the proudest monarch that ever swayed a sceptre. Liberty is a spirit sent from God and like its great Author is no respecter of persons.” 

Henry Highland Garnet

Evans and Jeanette Walton. Ghana. Began Serving 2016

Evans is from northern. Ghana. His mother converted from Islam when he was young, and led him to Christ. As a young teenager he was active in the Elim Christian Center in Accra Ghana. After graduating from Ghana Christian University in 2009, he entered into an internship with WorldVenture Ghana, which led him to a ministry life focused on reaching the lost.  

Jeanette is from North Carolina. Jeanette had a passion for foreign missions. In 2013, she heard an invitation to serve in Ghana and she answered it; serving as an English teacher.  

Evans and Jeanette met in 2013. Evans was in Ghana on a break from his Seminary studies while Jeanette was serving there in an internship with WorldVenture Ghana. They married in 2016 and are now serving as missionaries in Navrongo – Upper East Region of Ghana.

Their Mission Statement: To glorify God by loving Christ, worshiping Him and seeing His kingdom come in Navrongo, Ghana through engaging the community by way of the local church, evangelizing, and holistically raising fruit bearing disciples who will do likewise and reach the unreached.

Jeanette is working at increasing educational access for children in northern Ghana so that more families can read and study the Word of God for themselves. She is drawing lost souls to the gospel through education and performance.

Evans says that, “the realization of God’s grace in my life, from being raised by a widowed single mother in a small village, to attending institutions of higher learning to teach others about the saving grace of Christ, has pushed me to give my all to Him; we are blessed, to be a blessing.” In August of 2015, Evans completed a Bachelor’s degree in theology from International Leadership University (ILU) in Nairobi,Kenya. 

They serve at the Navrongo Community Nursing College and the University of Development Studies- Navrongo – praying for and welcoming new students. They have planted a church, Hope Community Church, and started a special needs Christian school, Jeanette Okunyade Special Children School (named after the late Dr. Jeanette Okunyade).

Their ultimate desire is to see lives transformed by Christ in Ghana, and within the continent of Africa. They are involved in evangelism on the University of Development Studies campus, discipleship, Christian Leadership Development and Community Development. 

Join their team – in prayer, in financial support, or to serve with them: https://worldventure.com/pmissionary/4000-329-walton-evans-and-jeanette/

Louise (“Lulu”) Cecilia Fleming served in Congo; 1887 – 1899.

Lulu was born in 1862 as a slave in Florida. In 1887 she became a missionary teacher in Congo. The school had 49 students, and many of them came to Christ through Lulu’s ministry to them. The students were introduced to Jesus because of Lulu’s ministry to them.

This seems a poor report…and perhaps many may think the work almost discouraging, but to us whom God has given the privilege to labor here it is very encouraging. [It] fills us with unspeakable joy. “

Lulu combined her teaching with weekend evangelistic work in the towns, and within a year, she had learned Kikongo and no longer required a translator. When Lulu saw that women needed to be reached, she began making home visits while urging the mission society (American Baptist Foreign Mission Society of the West) to send more women.

In 1891 Lulu returned to the USA as a student at the Women’s Medical College in Philadelphia; Lulu returned to the Congo in 1895 as a medical missionary.

Known as Dr. Fleming, she was stationed at Irebu, further up the Congo River, where she needed to learn a different language. The power of Dr. Fleming’s ministry came from her identification with those among whom she served. The Baptist Missionary Magazine described her as “particularly successful in winning the hearts of the Congo people, putting herself in close touch and sympathy with them.” 

She passed away in 1899 from complications from African sleeping sickness.

Righteous Sensitivity

Ephesians 4: 19

I’ve seen so many news stories in the last few weeks that show terrible people relationships. News about people killing folk who will not stay in a relationship with them. Stories about people killing folk who have stolen what a person thought was their own love. Stories about people in relationships with the spouses of others. Stories about people taking what belongs to others by force – sometimes power, sometimes material things; about people considering themselves higher than other people; people thinking themselves perfectly right – and others as perfectly wrong. It amazed me as I was listening to a story, and the only thing they had in ‘common’ was what they both called their belief in Christ. Their hate and distaste for one another were immense! The desire for what the other person had was crazy! But the biggie is that their reflection of Christ was completely absent!

As I go about to and fro in the world, it would benefit me to remember the state of these people. Why? Because I am less likely to judge when I understand that nothing within them would restrain them. Now with that said, what about believers who live this way? Are they indeed believers?!?!

It is imperative that I now shun my responsibility to my brethren in reminding them that the Holy Spirit living in them is sufficient for restraint or escape from temptation. I pray for salvation; for the brethren, I pray for their maturity in Christ.

I am asking God to teach my heart to know when it is time to teach an unbeliever. I am asking him to move me in swiftly when it is time for reproof – as in the life of a believer. May my heart be ever sensitive to God’s leading and may the hearts of my brethren heed to the leading of His Holy Spirit.

Keep us from evil, Lord. Lead us from temptation.