Lloyd and Jan Chinn; 2002 – present

Thank you for reading my blog during Black History Month as I highlighted some of my heroes. I hope that you have learned a lot and that your heart has been turned toward missions. Here’s our story ….

Lloyd and Jan Chinn are native to Texas. Lloyd from Edna, TX and Jan from Houston, TX.

In 1999, Lloyd was invited to Ghana, West Africa on a short term mission. Lloyd and Jan had never even met a missionary and had no desire to enter into missionary service; they scarcely knew where Africa was – and had never heard of Ghana. God provided the funds for the journey and they took that as confirmation that Lloyd was to go. God spoke to Lloyd clearly on that trip that Africa would be his context of ministry.  In 2000 they took all of their children and 22 other people to the same little town in Ghana – and on that trip, Jan’s experience opened her eyes to the need for discipleship in Ghana.

In 2002, Lloyd received his ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary and that same year they were appointed as long term missionaries with WorldVenture. They moved to Ghana in 2004 with their two sons and opened WorldVenture’s new field of ministry in Ghana. The Chinn’s served in the town of Nkwanta in Ghana’s Volta Region. Their ministry focus was Pastoral Leadership Development. As they became for familiar with the community, they added Orphan Care, Educational Development, Women’s Empowerment and Community Economic Development. They were blessed by The Lord to design and begin the construction of a Leadership Development Center; a Short Term Missions home; and, a Poultry Farm.

In 2013, they returned to the USA on a home assignment which was supposed to last 10 months and during this time, they were asked by the leadership of WorldVenture to take on the role – Global Director for Africa. In March 2014, they stepped in to this new role.

Lloyd and Jan are the first African Americans to serve as Global Directors for WorldVenture. The new role has added 12 additional countries to their Africa ministry life.

Lloyd and Jan are also serving MANI (the Movement for African National Initiatives) as the North America Diaspora Coordinator. They also serve at Crossover Bible Fellowship as leads of the Missions Ministry (Front Door to Frontier).

Lloyd’s firm message to the African American church has been the same from the beginning of their journey: “Pray! Pay! or Pack!”

If you want to serve long term in Africa — WorldVenture is, in our opinion, the best organization to join. Get in contact with us, we will gladly show you the way! Email us at J.Chinn@WorldVenture.com or at missions@crossoverbf.com

https://worldventure.com/pmissionary/4000-110-chinn-lloyd-and-jan/

Serving Now

This is just a FEW of the currently serving African American Missionaries

Sublime and Rachel Mabiala

Sublime grew up in the Congo. Rachel was born in Detroit, Michigan. They met at Fuller Theological Seminary when they were both studying Missiology and International Development. Rachel’s grandmother prophesied that she would become a missionary when she was quite young; Later Rachel spent many summers on short term trips to Asia and Africa. Sublime carried a family legacy of ministry which was started by his grandfather, and served as a missionary in West Africa, the Arab world and in the USA. The Mabialas became WorldVenture missionaries in August 2017 and are on their way to teach Missiology and Business for Gospel movements within and from Cote d’Ivoire. Learn more about them: https://worldventure.com/pmissionary/4000-004-mabiala-sublime-and-rachel/



Leon and Melanie Best

Leon and Melanie met when in college and then married. They started the Impact Movement at Rice University. And then served at Impact National Headquarters in Orlando Florida. They were invited to serve in South Africa where they are helping to rebuild the campus movement. The Bests say “We have found Isaiah 58:12 to be so true: Your people will rebuild ancient ruins and will raise up the age-old foundations; you will be called Repairer of Broken Walls, Restorer of Streets with Dwelling.”


Coleman Family

Richard completed his MDiv at Oral Roberts University. He took a short term trip to Uganda while a student and answered his call to missions. While waiting to serve overseas Richard has served as missions director for New Birth Church in Atlanta, GA and he has also led the recruiting and mobilization for TMS with a great heart for recruiting African American people. He also serves on the board of Lausanne. Richard, Amanda and their children have moved to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia where he and his wife are helping to mobilize and train Ethiopians for cross cultural missions.


Senga Family

Jean is Congolese & Deborah grew up in Baltimore, MD. They met and married at Deborah’s home church in Maryland. In May 2008 Jean followed the call of God and went ahead of his family to the Democratic Republic of Congo. The ministry has been powerful and productive. The Sengas have been in Congo for 10 years. They have started 3 churches and the Kinshasa Christian School. Their mission is: To equip, edify, train, and empower people in our communities by the power of the Holy Spirit, following the teachings, and the example of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ for the glory of our Father, the Eternal and living God.

George Leile – Jamaica; served 1782 to 1828

George Leile was born a slave in Virginia around 1750. He was led to Christ in 1774 in the church where his master, Mr. Sharpe, was a deacon. In 1778, Liele went to Savannah Georgia where he became the founding pastor of the First African Baptist Church – the very first permanent church building in America “built by blacks, for blacks.”.

In 1782 George Leile left with his wife and four children for Jamaica mainly to avoid being enslaved again – he left as an indentured servant, but began preaching the gospel as soon as he reached Jamaica. After two years – he had paid off his indenture and dedicated his life full time to the gospel. His venue; a race track in Kingston. He was soon able to gather a congregation, purchase a piece of land and build a church. By 1791 the new church, comprised of mostly blacks and a few whites grew to over 350 members. One year later the First African Baptist Church of Kingston grew to over 500 baptized converts. Three other congregations grew out of this body as well as a school for black children – both slave and free. As his influence and church grew, so did the persecution. In 1805 Jamaica enacted a law forbidding preaching to slaves. Because of the influence of George Liele, the Englishmen William Knibb and Thomas Burchell returned to England to campaign to end slavery in Jamaica. Liele would not live to see the resolution because he died in 1828 – 10 years before slavery was eradicated in Jamaica. (some historical writings say he died 1820)

One of the remarkable aspects of Leile’s ministry is that he did not wait for the Emancipation Proclamation before taking the gospel to the world. George Leile is believed to be the very first black American foreign missionary, the first black person in the US to be ordained a Baptist pastor, likely the first black Baptist pastor in the world and he is also believed to be the first American foreign missionary to contextualize the gospel.

Montrose & Anna White. Liberia and Sierra Leone. Served 31 years

Montrose Waite and his wife Anna were Christian and Missionary Alliance (CMA) missionaries to Liberia and Sierra Leone.  He was born in Jamaica in 1893, but became a naturalized American citizen.  He graduated from Nyack College in 1917 and three years later sailed for Sierra Leone.  He married Anna and they had seven children — all C&MA children were required to attend school at The Alliance school at Mamou, Guinea — however, Waite’s children were victims of racism there and were forced to leave the school.

Subsequently, C&MA left their ministry in Sierra Leone citing ‘over-extension’ — Anna Waite, however held to the stance that C&MA left their ministry in Sierra Leone to distance themselves from Black missionaries and the particular issues that they presented to the mission.  No African American missionaries were again appointed by the alliance until 1976 – some 50 years later. Montrose and Anna, along with their children, returned on furlough to the United States in 1937 and were unable to return to Africa with the C&MA because of opposition of many C&MA clergy and missionaries to black missionaries.

Undaunted – Waite and his wife continued their work by helping to organize the Afro-American Missionary Crusade and raising his own support.  He returned to Africa in 1948 as the AAMC’s field director and first missionary settling in Liberia where he began a school.  In Africa, Mr. Waite discovered a great amount of wonder on the part of local people at the appearance of a black missionary from North America. He recalled the African who rubbed his skin to make sure he was not simply painted.

“Are there other black people in America?” the African wanted to know. “There are many of them,” Mr. Waite replied, adding optimistically, “and they’ll be coming.”

Waite was a leader in building support in the African American church for foreign missions and in finding channels through which black American missionaries could go to Africa.  He continued as a missionary in Africa until 1962 – but remained active in missions until his death in 1977.

Evans & Jeanette Walton. Ghana. Began Serving 2016

Evans is from northern. Ghana. His mother converted from Islam when he was young, and led him to Christ. As a young teenager he was active in the Elim Christian Center in Accra Ghana. After graduating from Ghana Christian University in 2009, he entered into an internship with WorldVenture Ghana, which led him to a ministry life focused on reading the lost.  

Jeanette is from North Carolina. Jeanette had a passion for foreign missions. In 2013, she heard an invitation to serve in Ghana and she answered it; serving as an English teacher.  

Evans and Jeanette met in 2013 when Evans was in Ghana on a break from his Seminary studies while Jeanette was serving there with Lloyd and Jan’et Chinn.  Evans and Jeanette married in 2016 and are now serving as missionaries in the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Their Mission Statement: To glorify God by loving Christ, worshiping Him and seeing His kingdom come in Navrongo, Ghana through engaging the community by way of the local church, evangelizing, and holistically raising fruit bearing disciples who will do likewise and reach the unreached.

Jeanette is working at increasing educational access for children in northern Ghana so that more families can read and study the Word of God for themselves. She is drawing lost souls to the gospel through education and performance.

Evans says that, “the realization of God’s grace in my life, from being raised by a widowed single mother in a small village, to attending institutions of higher learning to teach others about the saving grace of Christ, has pushed me to give my all to Him; we are blessed, to be a blessing.” In August of 2015, Evans completed a Bachelor’s degree in theology from International Leadership University (ILU) in Nairobi,Kenya. 

Their ultimate desire is to see lives transformed by Christ in Ghana, and within the continent of Africa. They are involved in evangelism on the University of Development Studies campus, discipleship, Christian Leadership Development and Community Development. 

Join their team – in prayer, in financial support, or to serve with them: https://worldventure.com/pmissionary/4000-329-walton-evans-and-jeanette/