Black Missionary History – Marilyn Lewis

Marilyn Lewis was a woman whose desire was for African Americans to understand they had a place in God’s global mission.

Marilyn was a volunteer at the United States Center for World Mission – and helped lay the groundwork for their African American Mobilization Division. She was also founder and director of the Pasadena Institute of the Bible, which was designed for the training of lay workers in the African-American community. She funded this institute with her teaching salary from John Muir High School in Pasadena, CA. She earned her Th.M. from Dallas Theological Seminary and was working on her doctoral Thesis for Fuller Theological Seminary’s School of World Mission when she died suddenly in 2000 at the age of 48.

Her doctoral thesis was titled “The African American in Christian Missionary Movement”. Just prior to her unexpected death, Marilyn had written a call-to-action article where you will find these words: “Just look at an African-American church today and you can see testimony to our new era: richly decorated, air conditioned sanctuaries with carpeted floors are now quite common. Many drive to church in the latest model cars. Today, instead of working the tables at restaurants, many African Americans own them. God has blessed us. Now it is time for the African American to bless the world in evangelization efforts. In the past many African Americans cried because they could not become involved in missionary work. But now the doors are wide open and we are without excuse.”

I do not have  a picture of Marilyn – if anyone reading this has one I would appreciate it.